The Invisible Library (The Invisible Library #1) by Genevieve Cogman

21416690Summary (from http://www.goodreads.com):
The first installment of an adventure featuring stolen books, secret agents and forbidden societies – think Doctor Who with librarian spies!

Irene must be at the top of her game or she’ll be off the case – permanently…

Irene is a professional spy for the mysterious Library, which harvests fiction from different realities. And along with her enigmatic assistant Kai, she’s posted to an alternative London. Their mission – to retrieve a dangerous book. But when they arrive, it’s already been stolen. London’s underground factions seem prepared to fight to the very death to find her book.

Adding to the jeopardy, this world is chaos-infested – the laws of nature bent to allow supernatural creatures and unpredictable magic. Irene’s new assistant is also hiding secrets of his own.

Soon, she’s up to her eyebrows in a heady mix of danger, clues and secret societies. Yet failure is not an option – the nature of reality itself is at stake.

Review:

Oh my goodness! How wonderfully fun was this book?! Another recommendation from a fellow bibliophile, this was an addictive read.

Irene is a spunky, resourceful, professional spy who collects books for the mysterious Library. I enjoyed Irene’s asides (written in parenthesis) and the humour with which Cogman voices her. Kai, Irene’s apprentice, is powerful and enchanting and a trusted colleague. The interaction between Kai and Irene is, for a lack of a better word, fun to read.

I can’t say enough about how much I enjoyed this book. The mix of magic and mystery and adventure and a strong female lead has made this one of my favorite reads of this year (well, in the last two weeks!). I’m already on to the second book, The Masked Library (The Invisible Library #2)!

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Review: The Final Empire (Mistborn #1) by Brandon Sanderson

imageSummary (www.goodreads.com):

In a world where ash falls from the sky, and mist dominates the night, an evil cloaks the land and stifles all life. The future of the empire rests on the shoulders of a troublemaker and his young apprentice. Together, can they fill the world with color once more?

In Brandon Sanderson’s intriguing tale of love, loss, despair and hope, a new kind of magic enters the stage – Allomancy, a magic of the metals.

Review:

Oh my goodness! This is my second reading of the novel, and it’s even more amazing than the first time. The world building – Luthadel (the capital city) and the Empire itself is dark, grimy, treacherous and masterfully done. The characters, everyone from Kelsier and Vin to the crew of Allomancers, are fully developed – complex and multidimensional.

If you’re a fan of fantasy that is well written and complex, in the vain of Patrick Rothfuss and George R.R. Martin, then you must read this one. Sanderson is a master!

2014 Summer Reading Review – Part 1

So far, my 2014 Summer Reading has been eclectic. I’ve read everything from history to fantasy to young adult and to mystery. However, from what I have read so far, the novels that I enjoyed the most and would recommend to others are: Mr. Penumbra’s 24 Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan, The Salinger Contract by Adam Langer, and The Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker. These novels were suspense-filled, wonderfully written,  and just absolutely magical. Happy reading!

Review: The Absolute True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie (YA)

 

The Absolute True Diary of a Part-Time Indian

Summary (Goodreads):

In his first book for young adults, bestselling author Sherman Alexie tells the story of Junior, a budding cartoonist growing up on the Spokane Indian Reservation. Determined to take his future into his own hands, Junior leaves his troubled school on the rez to attend an all-white farm town high school where the only other Indian is the school mascot. Heartbreaking, funny, and beautifully written, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, which is based on the author’s own experiences, coupled with poignant drawings by acclaimed artist Ellen Forney, that reflect the character’s art, chronicles the contemporary adolescence of one Native American boy as he attempts to break away from the life he was destined to live.

 

Review:

A book recommendation by a student can be tricky at times, but this particular novel was absolutely perfect. The novel in turns is full of humor, anger, laughter, heartbreak, jaw-dropping disbelief, and sadness.

What I am trying to say, very inarticulately, is that this is a book that has to be read. It is painful, and frightening, and ugly (the violence, death, apathy that stems from alcoholism), but in the midst of this is pure hope. While the novel is classified as a young adult novel, it is for all ages. I highly recommend it.

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